Vasectomy Specialist

Himansh Khanna, MD, FACS -  - Urologist

Himansh Khanna, MD, FACS

Urologist located in Midtown East, Murray Hill, New York, NY & Park Slope, Brooklyn, NY

Every year, millions of men turn to vasectomy as a way to prevent unplanned pregnancy. Dr. Khanna uses advanced vasectomy techniques so his patients from Manhattan, Brooklyn, Queens and throughout the New York City area can reduce postoperative discomfort and speed healing.

Vasectomy Q&A

How does a vasectomy “work”?

When you ejaculate, sperm from the testicles travels through tubes called the vas deferens and exits through the penis. In a vasectomy, the vas deferens from each testicle is severed or clamped, preventing sperm from reaching the penis so it cannot be ejaculated and cause pregnancy. Vasectomy is considered a form of permanent birth control, although in many instances, a second procedure can reverse its effects and enable sperm to be ejaculated.

How is a vasectomy performed?

A vasectomy is performed as an outpatient procedure, which means you'll be able to go home the same day. The procedure uses two small incisions into your scrotum directly over each vas deferens or a single incision in the midline of your scrotum. The vas deferens are pulled up using forceps and severed, or cut. Then, the ends are sealed using sutures, clamps or electrocautery, a simple approach that uses heat to seal the ends. Scar tissue that forms in the weeks following the procedure also helps prevent sperm from escaping. Once the procedure is completed, the incisions will be closed with dissolvable stitches or a special adhesive bandage. You can return to work in a couple days, but should avoid heavy lifting for a week or two. Medication and ice can reduce discomfort.

Can I still ejaculate?

Yes; the sperm are just one part of the ejaculate. You'll still produce semen and the amount of ejaculate will not change noticeably. Having the vas deferens cut or clamped has no effect on ejaculation.

Does a vasectomy affect a man's desire or ability to have sex?

No, the vas deferens has no role in helping a man achieve or maintain an erection or having an orgasm; in fact, many men report an increase in desire once the fear of unplanned pregnancy is removed.

Major Insurance Providers Accepted

We accept most major insurance providers. If you have any questions, please call our office and we will be happy to assist you!

Aetna
Assurant Health
Blue Cross
Blue Cross Blue Shield
Cigna
Health Net
Liberty Mutual
MetLife
UnitedHealthcare
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